A Clear View: The Clearpoint Agency Blog

Best Time to Post on Social Media

Posted on March 15, 2016

The expression “timing is everything” could not be more true when it comes to posting on social media. It’s one thing to create fresh and exciting content, but what’s the point of posting something if your audience is not seeing it? Posting content at the right time, on the right day, and on the right platform can make all the difference between comments, clicks and shares, to no engagement all.

However, the best days and times to post do vary across all social media platforms. Below, we created an infographic and listed some tips and guidelines when it comes to the best days and times to post on social media:

FacebookFINAL Best Time to Post Infographic

We’ve found the best days to post on Facebook are later in the week, with the highest engagement rates occurring on Thursday and Friday. The Huffington Post found the optimal time of the day to post is in the afternoon from 1 – 4 p.m.

According to Quick Sprout, content that is posted at 1 p.m. will get the most shares, while 3 p.m. will give you the most clicks. In general, if you post during the 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. time frame you will still receive higher engagement than posts posted before work or later in the evening.

  • Best days to post: Thursday and Friday
  • Best times to post: 1 – 4 p.m.
  • Most shares: 1 p.m.
  • Most clicks: 3 p.m.
  • Broad timeframe to post: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

LinkedIn

Since LinkedIn’s audience is predominantly professionals, and used for networking and business status updates, the best days to post are during the core of the workweek – Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. LinkedIn is the “professional” social network so it makes sense that an Elle & Co. study discovered optimal times to post can be from 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m., just before lunchtime, and 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. Just as people check LinkedIn before their workday begins, are getting ready to break for lunch, or as they wrap-up for the day.

According to the Huffington Post, posting on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. -11 a.m. can be the “sweet spot” for status updates, and will get a high number of clicks and shares. Avoid posting on LinkedIn from 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. and on weekends.

  • Best days to post: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
  • Best times to post: 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. – 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Most engagement: Tuesdays from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Twitter

Audience is key when it comes to timing your tweets. According to Buffer, B2B organizations get higher clicks and retweets on Twitter during the workweek, with Wednesday having the highest click-through rates. However, B2C related tweets seem to perform better on the weekends. To get a maximum number of retweets, the Huffington Post suggests to tweet from 12 – 5 p.m., with around 5 p.m. being the most optimal.

  • Best day to tweet for B2B: Weekdays; Wednesdays have higher click-through rates
  • Best day to tweet for B2C: Weekends
  • Best time to tweet: 12 – 5 p.m.

So the next time you are planning your social strategy, give the day and time some thought. It just might make the difference between posting to an abyss or getting clicks, retweets and likes.

 

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10 Tips for Getting the Most out of 140 Characters

Posted on July 26, 2013

Social media has become an important tool for many businesses across the United States. About 87 percent of B2B companies are actively using social media for marketing purposes, and more than 50 percent are looking to increase their social media content in the next year. To reach their goals, businesses need to have a strong strategy tied to objectives when approaching each social media platform.

One of the most popular tools companies use for social media interaction is Twitter. Eighty percent of B2B marketers use Twitter, making it the second most popular platform used, right behind LinkedIn. Many people find there are two main challenges with Twitter. The first being Twitter’s 140-character limit; and the second finding ways to get more engagement on Twitter. To make your job easier, we put together a list of 10 tips to help you get the most out of your tweets.

  1. It’s OK to abbreviate – If you use Twitter you know that it is sometimes necessary to shorten words, to use numbers instead of spelling things out, and to use symbols where possible. Using “&” instead of “and” or typing “w/” instead of “with” is sometimes a must. It doesn’t obey proper grammar or AP style, but Twitter plays by a different set of rules.
  2. Always shorten links – Conserving characters is key. Using a site like bit.ly allows you to make a long website address much shorter. Inserting links can be very useful for driving traffic to your own content, or for sharing something interesting. Links invite the audience to interact with your tweet and possibly retweet.
  3. Use #hashtags – The goal of social media marketing is to have your audience interact with your brand. It’s easier to cast a wider net by using hashtags. Twitter users can search the site by hashtags, and if you tweeted recently with the hashtag they searched, they are more likely to find your tweet. Check to see what hashtags are trending and you may be able to get in on a popular conversation topic by using the right hashtag. It’s #important to #remember not to #overload the #user with too many #hashtags; they can be #distracting.
  4. Mention other @users – Interacting directly with users is a great way to utilize 140 characters. If your message is short enough, leave room to give a shout to a follower or someone you follow. Mentioning another user will appear on their Twitter feed, increasing the chances of engagement. Starting conversations with the @ symbol is the “social” part of social media.
  5. Ask questions – One of the best ways to encourage your audience to interact with you is by posing questions. It can be something simple like “Who else has plans for the upcoming holiday?” It can also relate to your business: “Would your company ever make this drastic decision?” Leaving the questions vague in that way helps build intrigue. Then, a curious follower will feel inclined to answer your question by mentioning you in a reply!
  6. Ask for retweets and do the same – Retweets are the most useful way to interact because not only is someone finding your content interesting enough to recycle from their own account, your tweet and your brand are now being exposed to their entire list of followers, thus growing your social media web. Asking for retweets is like an invitation for your followers to interact with your company. For example, “RT (retweet) with your favorite social media platform!” And be sure to RT tweets you find interesting as well.  This will encourage others to do the same for you.
  7. Add picturesVisual content drives engagement. Including a picture increases your tweet’sclickability.” People are more inclined to click on a link that promises a visual. Even if other users do not interact with your company by retweeting or mentioning your post, the information and your brand are still getting noticed.
  8. Tweet at the right time – Peak times when your audience is on Twitter vary. It is important to keep an eye on what times of day work best to tweet. Considering the limited amount of information you can put out there, and the fact that there is no control over if your audience will notice it at all, timing out your tweets properly gives you an advantage in reaching your audience. You can also use different social media tools to track when key users and followers are tweeting. With the ability to monitor their activity over time, you can build a window of optimal tweet times every day.
  9. Tweet more often – Tweeting multiple times is better than tweeting sporadically – it is important to be consistent in your strategy. First, tweeting more often is a way of getting more of your content out. It increases the likelihood of engaging with your audience as well as the odds that more people will see your tweets on their home feed. Tweeting more than once a day shows that you are an active Twitter user and that your company has content to communicate on a daily basis.
  10. Use analytics – There are many websites available that companies can use to track their Twitter experience. Getting the most out of your tweets means using these sites as a tool to understand how social media is working for you. It is easier with these analytics tools to track numbers, statistics, users and trends. Staying on top of social media will require keeping an eye on your followers, mentions and engagement.

 

Social media is an exciting world of interaction that has changed the way business, marketing, advertising and news are handled. Using Twitter is a great way for B2B companies to keep in touch with their key audiences. Twitter is also the perfect landscape for introducing new content, reposting other’s content and discussing it with a wide community that shares your company’s interests. Getting noticed amidst all of the companies striving for attention is not easy. It takes a well thought out strategy to guarantee you get the most out of 140 characters.

This blog was contributed by Ryan Sabatini, Account Coordinator at Clearpoint Agency.

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10 Ways to Stand Out at Your Next PR Job Interview

Posted on June 19, 2013

With school out and recent grads being on the hunt for jobs, we decided that it would be a great time to give new professionals tips on nailing an interview and succeeding at it. We’ve recently been conducting interviews for our summer internship position, and what we thought were common-sense standards were simply common mistakes. Here are 10 tips to remember for your next application and interview.

    bigstock-Penguins-Recruiting-Interview-6.14

  1. Write a killer cover letter – by that I mean a personalized email to the company you are applying at. Look at their website, and find the right person to address your email to. If you’re unsure, LinkedIn can be a great source of information.
  2. Keep the subject line of your email simple – don’t get too creative. If you opt for anything like “super important” or “urgent” you risk that your email could pass for spam and might be rejected.
  3. Arrive on time at your interview – five to 10 minutes early is acceptable, but don’t go too early. Often PR practitioners have hectic days, and their time is planned by the minute. If you arrive too early, the interviewer might feel pressured to see you sooner. Arriving late for an interview can create a bad first impression, so plan wisely and leave on time.
  4. Be well-prepared – research the company and its work/clients in advance. Often you may not need to discuss that, but sometimes an interviewer can ask you which of the company’s clients you found most interesting or what are some publications you noticed the company received coverage in. These are just examples, but it’s always best to be well prepared.
  5. Ask thoughtful questions – if you’ve done research ahead of time, you will easily come up with questions at the interview. If not, some common ones are description of the position and duties, company policies, culture and so on. You might also ask what an ideal candidate is to them.  This will tell you what hard and soft skills the firm values.
  6. Know your resume well and the samples you have provided. Be ready to go into a deeper discussion about your previous work, team projects, challenges and so on. This also shows how prepared you are – if you present examples in your portfolio you can’t talk about, it will make the interviewer doubtful whether you were even part of that particular project.
  7. Highlight your strengths and think of concrete examples – just in case you are asked to elaborate. Situational questions are very common at interviews, and this would be your chance to impress the interviewer by choosing relevant examples that show how you handle challenges well.
  8. Dress professionally – club wear excluded! If you’re not sure whether your outfit is appropriate, it probably isn’t. I recommend to wear something conservative rather than casual. Usually by looking at a company’s website you can get a good feel of their culture, but still avoid jeans and short dresses or distracting items such as big jewelry and bright make-up.
  9. Set aside enough time for the interview. In the PR world, interviews sometimes start with written assignments on the spot that can last for about 30 minutes to an hour. Make sure your calendar is clear for that day, so that you don’t feel rushed or stressed out.
  10. Send hand-written ‘thank you’ notes – this way you will set yourself apart from other candidates. It might not guarantee you getting the job, but if you were one of the top interviewees, it will increase your chances.

This post was contributed by Antonia Genov, Account Executive at Clearpoint Agency

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Be More Active and Engaging on Social Media!

Posted on May 03, 2011

         Tried and True Social Media Tips from the Now Revolution and Clearpoint Agency

Welcome to the Now Revolution! You may not know what the Now Revolution is, but you are a part of it every day. Essentially the Now Revolution is the fast paced, never-ending news river world that we are finding ourselves swamped in. I attended the Now Revolution seminar recently, hosted by San Diego’s PRSA and Ad Club, and it re-invigorated my passion for all things social. The lecturers and authors, Jay Baer and Amber Naslund, did a nice job of summarizing how to be more active on social media, so I thought I would pass on the highlights and add some social media tips of our own.

In today’s environment everyone is a reporter. When you visit a restaurant and comment about it on Yelp, you’re taking power into your own hands. This is empowering for all of us but poses a tricky situation for companies. They have little time to verify comments, even less time to coordinate a response, and even less time to actually react. So how are companies supposed to deal with the fast-paced world and never-ending news cycle that social media has created?

Here’s what Baer and Naslund suggest:

Have a Social Media Policy Companies must have a social media policy in place. Everyone should be on the same page and understand the companies’ stance on issues. This is a simple thing to create but overlooked by many companies.

Turn Negatives into Positives Negative comments are your chance to learn and find out what your company needs to improve on. Make negative comments your opportunity to learn and grow as a company.

LISTEN Understand how social media integrates with your company. Make sure the person who is speaking on social media platforms for your company is also listening. Search ‘Anybody Know’ on Twitter, give out free coupons on Four Square, monitor client brands on Yahoo Answers.

ROI There is no magic measurement tool, it depends on what you are looking for and measure that. Spread social media results around. Companies aren’t sure they’re measuring correctly and all too often don’t spread social media results. What would happen if only coaches knew the score of the game?

Turn Customer Success Stories into Blog Posts Humanity is the story. Attract a following with people not logos. Remember Subway’s Jared? Of course you do! We all do!

We agree and employ these tactics on behalf of our clients and ourselves.  Now for a few Clearpoint Agency social media tips . . .

Hire Employees with Passion Would you want a doctor that wasn’t passionate about medicine?  In today’s world it’s important to not only hire people who know their stuff, but who love their stuff. Employees will be representing your organization – everyone is a marketer- so it’s important that they believe in the company and the work they are doing every day.

Know Thy Self All employees must be on the same page. Everyone in your business has to understand the company’s culture and how to respond. All employees must have the power to communicate and speak quickly without the need for approvals.  If you wait to run every Twitter response through a weekly meeting, it’s too late.

Take it Offline Some conversations need to go offline. If a customer is upset, your best response is to apologize for the situation online, then offer to resolve it offline and provide your contact information. No one can fault you for trying to resolve the issue but the last thing you want is a boxing match online for the world to see.

A Thank You Goes a Long Way Thanking someone for retweeting a story or content you tweeted, or for commenting on your Facebook or LinkedIn posts goes a long way to forming  valuable relationships in the fast paced world of the social media.

Add a little something extra Just simply retweeting or giving a post thumbs up takes a little effort and it shows. When you retweet or like a post or video, provide your spin on it. Give your opinion and tell your friends and followers why they should care too. Yes, it takes a little extra time, but the little time it takes speaks volumes to your approach to being a part of the conversation and not just an observer.

This post was contributed by Rachel Hutman, Clearpoint Agency Account Executive.

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